SCHEDULE A VISIT

2600 Cordes Dr, Ste D
Sugar Land, TX 77479
p. 281-299-5187 | 832-939-8876
admin@montessorikidssugarland.com

The Hands-On Approach to Learning

page-2_img01

Hands-on learning is one of the attributes that distinguishes a Montessori classroom from a classical educational environment. Students are encouraged to learn by touching, feeling, and doing rather than typical mundane worksheets. Dr. Maria Montessori said; “The hands are the instruments of man’s intelligence.” Useful information can be better committed to permanent memory by learning hands-on than in any other way. Repetition and manipulation is key!

The Traditional Approach

In a traditional learning environment, children sit in rows of desks and listen to the direction of their teacher. They are given very little choice as the mindset is collective – what is best for the group as a whole. They are told what to complete and when, making learning a dull and forced experience. When it comes time to take a test, students dump what they have recently learned onto a piece of paper and forget much of it soon after. But education is not “one size fits all.” Each child learns differently and develops on a unique spectrum. A Montessori classroom provides the apparatus for this to take place.

The Montessori Approach

There are no desks in a Montessori classroom. In this learning environment, children are encouraged to move around the room and choose from the vast array of activities available to them. Once they choose an activity, they bring it to a floor mat or child size furniture and complete their work comfortably. They are free to explore their materials and make discoveries for themselves.

When children work with their hands, information becomes concrete and difficult to forget. Learning is designed to be an enjoyable experience instead of something children dread. Instead of relief when a lesson is completed, students find excitement in moving on to the next level.

Hands-on Materials

While any subject can be learned with a pencil and paper, the Montessori classroom presents educational subjects through colorful, engaging materials. Examples include:

  • Math. Rods, beads, and sandpaper numbers are used to learn basic counting and arithmetic. Students use their hands to manipulate materials and work out problems in a sensory way.
  • Reading. A moveable alphabet allows children to move letters around and learn their sounds. They can choose what words they would like to learn and gradually evolve their reading ability.
  • Writing. Montessori classrooms use painting and tracing exercises to fine tune the pincer grasp and integrate reading and writing.
  • Science. Challenging hands-on experiments allow children to learn about the world around them in a beautiful and sensory way.

When it comes to a rich education, a hands-on approach is the way to go. This is the most effective as well as enjoyable way for children to learn. When a student moves up in their education they will remember what they learned through their experiences and apply those lessons throughout their life.

April 20th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori Education

Bringing the Montessori Method Home

The Montessori method encourages order, independence, self-respect, and overall learning. Montessori classrooms are carefully designed to train young minds to care for themselves and learn from their environment. Students gain an “I did it myself!” attitude that pushes them to excel in all aspects of their lives. The Montessori experience doesn’t have to stop at the end of a school day. There are many ways that you as a parent can instill the Montessori method in your own home!

Provide an Organized Environment

Children generally respond positively to order and structure. Make sure there is a place for everything on a child friendly scale. Your children can find what they need and know exactly where to look for it. They also know where to put an object once they are finished. This promotes self-discipline and independence. An organized environment also gives fewer opportunities for distractions, allowing the child to focus on tasks. A few ways you can provide an ordered environment are:

  • Low shelves. Make your children’s belongings accessible to them. Low, child-height shelves and a lower curtain rod, for example, show children they can do things on their own.
  • Step stool in the bathroom and kitchen. This encourages children to use the bathroom by themselves as well as wash their hands.
  • Keep toys in low, open shelves. Organize all toys and learning activities so each item or type of toy has its own place. This makes cleanup time less of a hassle and your child will need less help from you.
  • Access to food. Keep healthy snacks and drinks on a low shelf so your children can help themselves make healthy choices.

Teach Practical Real-Life Skills

Never underestimate what your children are capable of doing on their own. Basic chores teach children to help others as well as care for themselves when they are older. Responsibilities make kids feel like they are valued members of a family and community. Washing tables, doing laundry, helping younger children, and preparing simple meals are perfect examples of ways your child can learn basic life skills.

Children are most willing to work and learn when they feel that their work has value. Bringing the Montessori method home builds pride and confidence from within a child. A parent can help nurture children’s inner enthusiasm by expressing encouragement and appreciation for their work. Children who take pride in their actions will learn to continue to produce work that brings even more pride.

April 13th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori Education

What’s your child’s learning style?

Learning_Styles

 

Five toddlers are in a playgroup. Within the group, Emily learns to say the names of the shapes first. Jeff is the first to climb the monkey bars while his twin sister Kim watches cautiously from the sidelines before diving into any new adventure. The fourth child, Steve, can usually be found studying board books in the corner of the room while Jaclyn delights in hands-on play with mud, sand, and water.

Kids of all age groups pick up information in different ways. Educators have long proclaimed that children have their own distinct learning style and the “one-size-fits-all” theory can’t be applied to children in a typical classroom setting.

Researchers have agreed that there are three primary learning styles: auditory, tactile/kinesthetic, and visual. Most children (and adults) utilize a combination of these learning styles while a handful follow mostly one. Understanding your child’s learning style at an early age can help them become better learners and reduce frustrations as they progress to an advanced classroom.

Learning Styles Explained

Auditory: These types of learners prefer listening to explanations rather than reading. They are also more likely to:

  • Have difficulty with written material
  • Remember information by reading aloud
  • Enjoy group discussions
  • Require explanations orally

Tactile/Kinesthetic: The tactile and kinesthetic learners process information through touch and move method. They usually prefer to move around while learning and often “talk” with their hands. They also like to touch objects to learn more about them.

A note to remember: These types of learners are often referred to as “troublemakers” because they are unable to sit still and are often found fidgeting when asked to sit for long periods of time. In the right environment, however, these learners thrive and often become the innovators of the future.

Visual: Just like the name suggests, visual learners pick up information by watching. One of the most dominant learning styles, the visual learning method is the most used in traditional classrooms. Children who are visual learners are more likely to understand new learning material by:

  • Looking at pictures about what they are being taught
  • Drawing what they are learning
  • Writing down instructions

Children who are visual learners are less able to perform well when they are just given instructions and would rather be shown how to do something practically.

Is there a fourth type of learner?

Experts have also discovered a fourth learning style, the logical or analytical learner. These types of learners explore and understand the concept before indulging further. Similar to Kim in playgroup, logical learners ask a lot of questions and are more able to grasp information from a young age.

Discover your child’s learning style.

We sometimes assume that there is only one right way to teach children a particular skill. But if we adapt the learning methods to make them more appropriate to the style children prefer, there is no skill the child cannot learn.

 

March 10th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori Education

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

A Look Inside a Montessori Classroom

To understand the nature of Montessori education, all you need is to take a look inside their classrooms. Montessori classrooms are enticing and thoughtfully organized in a way that captivates young minds. Every detail that goes into these classrooms is designed to give your child the absolute best educational experience.

Classroom Design

A Montessori classroom has a natural flow that allows learning to be centered on choice. These spacious rooms have many exciting features such as:

  • Learning areas divided by subject. Subjects like math, science, reading, and language-arts are all given their own space in a Montessori classroom. This prevents boredom and gives the children the ability to move freely around the room, effectively absorbing information as they go.
  • The atmosphere is inviting. Natural lighting and soft colors provide a soothing environment. Children in this type of setting tend to be more relaxed and focused, giving them the best chance at an enriched education.
  • There are no desks. The Montessori classroom is anything but traditional. Tables and child size couches are some of the furniture pieces you will find in these rooms. Students also work on mats and rugs on the floor. This adds to the variety of ways Montessori students can learn.
  • Everything is elegantly organized. One of the most striking details of the Montessori classroom is organization. Everything is stored neatly, and all materials have a designated place. Students quickly learn where to go to find what they need for any activity.

Learning Styles

Montessori classrooms offer a variety of learning experiences, so each child’s personal learning style is accepted and nurtured. In a typical day, you will observe:

  • Group learning. Students have the option of learning alongside other children. This hones their sense of friendship and social skills. There is a variety of activities suited for multiple students to participate in at the same time.
  • Independent learning. Montessori students are encouraged to learn independently. Learning on their own builds confidence and gives them the skills to work out problems with a little help. Many Montessori style learning activities are designed to provide opportunities to self-correct and teach themselves.
  • Teacher instruction. Though Montessori students are taught independence, teachers still play a big role in their education. Montessori educators nurture and gently guide students through activities in both group and independent settings.

The Montessori classroom is a learning environment unlike any other. When you take a look inside our rooms, it is not hard to see why Montessori-style learning is so effective and unique.

February 13th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori Education

How to spark creativity in children

pretend-play

Creativity is all about expressing oneself. It is all about being imaginative and trying new things. There is a misconception that creativity is limited to arts, crafts, music, dance, and writing. But creativity has no bounds and can be expressed in other areas of life as well.

It is sometimes assumed that children are more creative while others lack the talent. However, that is not the case and each one of us (including children) is capable of expressing ourselves in a unique way.

Of course, some children do get lost in the wonders of their imagination easily while others require more prompting. It is up to the parents, teachers, and other caregivers to encourage children and use real life experiences to spark their creativity which makes them more confident and competent learners in the future.

Here are some ideas to spark kids’ creativity:

Ask questions.

Children are born curious. They ask a lot of questions. Listen to them and inspire their imagination by asking them more questions. Make them wonder, “What if” and “What would have happened if we had a dinosaur for a pet?”

Don’t hover.

As much as we want to interfere, it is sometimes better to stand back and watch from afar. Let children play their own games without trying to manage them.

Limit TV and computer games.

TV programs and computer games are enjoyable for some time but children should not be allowed to zone in on the screen for long periods of time. Screen time should always be limited for young children.

Create art pieces with children.

Foremost, parents should keep an abundant supply of art materials in their home. From simple items such as papers and crayons to adornments like rhinestones, gems, and beads, children should have access to all and encouraged often to create pieces of art with them. It is also a good idea to sit down with children once in a while and make crafts together.

Encourage pretend play.

Young children love to play pretend with dolls, costumes, and accessories. Stock up on old dresses, Halloween costumes, hats, jewelry, and any other items that can help children jump into a new role. Keep them all accessible for children so they can enter the world of make believe whenever they like.

Read to children.

Books open a gateway for children to unlock their creative and imaginative potential. Read as often as you can. Make reading fun by changing your tone of voice or dressing up as the character in the book. Ask them to draw characters from their favorite book or allow them to act out the scenes from the story.

Most importantly, be a positive role model for children and enjoy the fun, creative, and imaginative life. If your children seeing you living life, they will do the same!

February 10th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori Education

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,

Multi-Age Grouping in a Montessori Classroom

Multi-Age Grouping in a Montessori Classroom
In a traditional school setting, classrooms are divided by a single age group. Montessori educators believe that multi-age grouping is more beneficial for students, a concept that makes a lot of sense once fully understood. Montessori children are almost always placed in classes of a 3-year age group. This practice is tried and true, designed to bring the best educational experience possible to your child.

Multi-Age Groups and Small Children

Small children are often eager to learn from other children. It is common to see children play “school” during recess or pretend time. Younger kids tend to learn best when their education is disguised as play. Montessori Classrooms take this “game” and use structured activities to allow children to “teach themselves.”

Students are given direct lessons from their teachers but also benefit when learning from their peers. The younger students learn from the older, and the older students learn through teaching and example. Small children can watch the older kids take on more advanced lessons and learn through observation. This way, it is easy for Montessori educators to get a feel for where each child stands in their development.

Multi-Age Groups and Older Children

The same concept applies to older children, but in a more advanced way. Teaching someone else is an extremely effective way to reinforce your own knowledge. Children in Montessori classrooms teach each other real lessons that are often assigned by a teacher. A younger student enjoys being taught by an older student, and the older student can easily pinpoint what they do and do not know. This inspires them to go and seek the information that they are missing.

In a traditional classroom setting, opportunities for leadership are few and far between. What opportunities they may have are assigned by a teacher, giving little actual freedom to the student. In a Montessori classroom, these opportunities present themselves daily. Each child is free to express themselves, share knowledge, and sharpen each other’s skills.

Each child is unique in their gifts and development. Self-directed, peer-to-peer learning creates a student who is ready, willing, and excited to learn. The multi-age group concept breeds confidence in its older learners, inspires young students, and creates a unique and highly effective learning experience for everyone.

January 30th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori Education

Tags: , , , ,

Success through Montessori Style Learning

Success through Montessori Style Learning

The Montessori Method is a method of education that emphasizes the importance of keeping children at the center of activities and lessons. It is a set of beliefs that seeks to allow children to be themselves and act as children tend to behave. More specifically, the Montessori Method encourages the eagerness of children to explore their world and actively engage with their environment and their peers. This is much different from the more traditional method of schooling, which tends to place children in rigid classrooms that demand their attention and obedience. This can have a poor effect on children and actually work to reduce their interest in learning and observation.

The Montessori Triangle

As a highly effective educational method, the Montessori Method makes use of three separate elements. The child, the environment, and the teacher create what is sometimes known as a learning triangle. Every point is important for the overall success of the program. The environment, usually carefully prepared and organized by the teacher, is meant to stimulate interest and encourage children to engage. The teacher works to keep order while also guiding children through periods of self-teaching as well as more traditional instruction. The child, of course, is the center of the entire process and the most important point. All other points on the triangle are created to foster their intellect and ability.

Multiage Groups

Another important aspect of the Montessori Method is the use of groups of multi-age children. This is beneficial to both the younger and older children. Older children, for example, can help the younger children learn new concepts or ideas. Younger children provide older children with a means to reinforce their previous learning by helping someone new to the concept. In this way, a beneficial environment for all involved is created.

Allowing children to interact with their environment, their peers, and their teachers can have incredible effects upon their desire and ability to learn. Montessori style learning is one that can have a surprising amount of success, and help bring children to new academic heights and pursuits.

January 25th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori Education

Tags: , , ,

Start the new year right

reading

A New Year has started and most of us have resolved to make ourselves better in one way or other in the year 2017. Although most New Years resolutions focus primarily on developing healthy habits, we at Montessori Kids Universe have another one for our parents – to foster reading habits in young children that encourage them to be better readers.

Every day you and I and millions of parents around the world feed and care for their children so they grow into happy and healthy individuals; however, we should also provide them with all the essentials that enhance their learning abilities.

Reading plays an important role in the growth and development of children. Studies have shown that children who are read to from an early age are likely to do better when transferred to formal education. Through stories, children are exposed to a wide variety of words which further enhance their language skills. Additionally, reading is a great form of entertainment and can be enjoyed anytime, anywhere.

Sadly, in a world full of television, video games, and mobile devices – getting children to read and taking the time out to read TO them is becoming a challenge on its own. However, if reading skills are established at an early age – children grow up to be better learners, listeners, and speakers.

So, this New Year, let’s all join hands and make a resolution that we will encourage better reading habits in our children. To help you out, here are some tips that you can apply on a regular basis.

READ EVERYDAY!

Create a habit of reading to children every day. Whether it’s at night before sleeping or after school – set aside at least 20 minutes when you put everything aside and read different books together. By following a set schedule, children will understand that reading is an important activity and will look forward to spending more time with you.

FILL CHILDREN’S ROOMs WITH BOOOKS!

Purchase plenty of books that are in accordance with your child’s age group and keep them at their reaching level. For budget-friendly options, you can also visit Book Fairs and thrift shops. The more variety children have, the more they will be encouraged to read or ask you to read to them.

BE A ROLE MODEL!

Children do what they see. Instead of fiddling around all day with your smartphone, let them see you reading. Show them how much you enjoy reading books and magazines to encourage them as well.

GET A LIBRARY CARD!

Visits to libraries are always fun. Take children to the nearest library and allow them to find books that they would like to read. Let them choose in order to build their interest level and confidence as well.

READ EVERYWHERE!

Reading should not be limited to books only. Make it fun by reading signs on shops when you are travelling or on everyday items such as cereal and milk boxes, toothpaste, and juice bottles.

Try these tips with your young ones and start 2017 in the right way – by giving children the gift of reading which they can cherish for a lifetime.

January 3rd, 2017

Posted In: Montessori Education

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Preschool Writing Development Made Easy

preschool writing4 Fun Montessori Inspired Activities Your Child Will love

Do you want to help your preschooler learn to write, but don’t know where to start? Montessori educators have some great solutions, and parents across the US are catching on the benefits of their teaching methods. Here are four fun-filled early writing activities that you and your child will love!

Montessori Alphabet Boxes

The first step to learning to write is recognizing each letter of the alphabet. This fun activity will do that and more. You’ll need a box or basket for every letter of the alphabet, each labeled with a single letter. For each box, have your child help you locate items around your home that starts with that letter. For example, a letter “B” box could contain a toy bear, ball, brush, and buttons. This activity is great because it creatively teaches your child letter recognition, phonics, and real-life application.

Sand Writing Tray

Writing starts with engagement, and what better way to captivate your child than letting him play in the dirt! This writing activity is a great starting point for letter recognition and basic motor skill development, and setup is simple. All you need is a small wooden box, sand, and ABC flashcards. Fill the box about half-way with sand and place a single flashcard at a time beside the box. Have your child trace the letter in the sand with the finger or a stick.

Chalkboard Water Letters

This mess-free game is a fun way to teach your preschooler basic writing skills. It also works well for learning to spell and write their name. A chalkboard easel works best, but you can also sit your child at a table with a tablet chalkboard. Write the desired letters with chalk. Give your child a cup of water and a paint brush, and encourage them to paint over the chalk letters with water.

Paint Dot-to- Dot ABCs

Paint makes any learning activity fun! This exercise helps your child recognize letters while practicing fine motor skills, and all you need is paper, paint, and Q-tips. Write letters on paper using a black marker. Along the lines of the letters, make dots so that it resembles a dot-to- dot picture. Place a small amount of your child’s favorite washable paint color in a cup or another washable container. Show your child how to dip a Q-tip into the paint, then mark your dots with paint. You can also have your child trace solid lines with paint instead of dot-to- dot letters.

Montessori educators know how to make learning engaging and memorable! With hands-on activities like these, your child will gain basic writing and reading skills in no time.

December 27th, 2016

Posted In: Montessori Education