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Montessori and Children with Learning Disabilities

Is Montessori effective for children with learning disabilities?

Today’s classrooms are comprised of children who benefit from differentiated learning. Some children have learning disabilities, such as attention deficit disorder, dyslexia, or dysphasia. Montessori schools can be quite beneficial for special needs students because they encourage them to work at their own pace.

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The Montessori Method promotes the belief that children learn best by doing. Montessori does not implement a one-size-fits-all curriculum, which aids students of different learning styles. The creator of the Montessori Method, Dr. Maria Montessori, worked with children with learning disabilities. In fact, the Montessori Method was initially inspired by students with special needs. It embraces the unique qualities within each child. Each student determines their own learning pace while staying motivated throughout the process.

With the Montessori Method, learning occurs through active pursuit of experiences. Students are encouraged to progress at their own speed. They begin a new activity once they are comfortable with what they have learned from the previous activity. They can work alone, with a partner, or within a group, remaining with a specific learning activity as long as they want and progressing onto the next one when ready.

Additionally, children receive an abundance of personal attention from instructors…an effective technique for individuals with learning disabilities. Instead of sitting at the front of the classroom, Montessori teachers move around the room observing and assessing each student while providing needed support.

Another positive outcome is that children with learning disabilities often discover that the multi-sensory, interactive setting created within the Montessori environment can be stimulating, resulting in the ideal venue for learning. In addition, many special needs children benefit from witnessing other children acting in what is perceived as normal and appropriate behavior.

Because the pace of learning is typically established by the children, they tend to stay motivated and feel better about school. Most special needs students also benefit from the increased personal attention, a trademark of Montessori schools.

So, is Montessori effective for children with special needs? We say…absolutely! Montessori is intended to help all children reach their potential at their own unique pace. The Montessori classroom is a community where children learn from each other and everyone contributes without feeling ahead or behind in relation to classmates.

December 6th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori Education

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The Internet as a Learning Tool

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The Internet is home to boundless amounts of information. With just a few seconds of your time and a Google search, you can have answers to nearly any question you can ask. For children, the number of questions is even more sizable, making the possibilities for learning even more plentiful.

While the Montessori hands-on approach has been proven to be effective for children’s development, it’s not always possible to replicate the same ideas at home. Materials can be expensive and setting up an environment like a Montessori classroom can be difficult. Fortunately, the Internet can act as a learning aid to children that, in combination with hands-on learning, can lead to endless exploration.

The Internet and Montessori Classrooms
Although the Internet is a great aid for continuing learning at home, it does not have a place in many Montessori classrooms. Montessori classrooms focus on concrete interaction with objects and learning materials. Teachers encourage hands-on learning and deriving meaning from physical objects which is not possible with the Internet. This allows the content to appeal to the senses, forming more meaningful connections for the child and leading to a greater understanding.

Why the Internet is a Useful Learning Tool for Children

  • Unlimited Learning Possibilities – Given the depth of the Internet, there are unlimited topics, subjects, and content for children to read and gain an interest in while learning.
  • Teaches Problem Solving & Computer Skills – Computers become more and more important to education every day, and working with computers can lead to better computer and problem-solving abilities because the Internet encourages abstract thought, a staple in problem solving.
  • Boosts Confidence – When children browse the Internet, they are exploring on their own (with supervision, of course). This leads to confidence boosts because they are learning independently.
  • Refines Coordination – The act of moving a mouse with your hand and seeing it move on a screen helps develop hand-eye coordination and fine motor skills.

How to Facilitate Learning at Home with the Internet

  • Treat It as an Extension of Physical Materials – The Internet allows for access to educational material of all grade levels without the need to replace old learning materials. Use educational software to further lessons from the curriculum.
  • Encourage Exploration of Interests – Expose your child to a wide array of topics and if they show interest in some, allow them to research the topics further themselves.
  • Work with your Child to Develop Cooperative Skills – Browsing with your child helps to build social and problem-solving skills, as well as form more meaningful connections with the information.

While a hands-on focus to learning is important to a child’s development, it can be magnified when supplemented with the boundless information hosted online. The Internet allows for exposure to tons of topics and teaches valuable skills that your children will use for the rest of their lives. Taking advantage of the Internet will allow you to set the best foundation possible, one that will inspire an interest in learning for years to come.

October 5th, 2017

Posted In: Montessori Education

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